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February 21, 2012 is International Mother Language Day, or Mother Tongue Day, first observed by the international community in 2000 expressly to promote linguistic diversity and multilingualism—this year’s theme is “Mother tongue instruction and inclusive education.” 

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VISIT OURMOTHERTOUNGES.ORG Cultural Survival's Endangered Languages Program invites you to explore American Indian language revitalization efforts nationwide in preparation for the November 17 national broadcast of the triumphant story of the reawakening and return home of the Wampanoag language. We Still Live Here - ?s Nutayune?n, starring the W?pan?ak Language Reclamation Project, airing nationally on PBS's Independent Lens series,

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This year the Jennifer Easton Community Spirit Award was awarded to Cultural Survival board member, Ramona Peters (Mashpee Wampanoag) for her commitment to sustaining the cultural values of her people by the First Peoples Fund. Ramona works with clay and other natural materials making ceramic vessels.

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Ma-lama Honua: World Wide Voyage Leg 2

This article is the third installment in a series documenting the historic undertaking of the three-year voyage of Hōkūle‘a, a full-scale replica of a wa‘a kaulua (Polynesian double-hulled voyaging canoe) around the world.

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Seven co-sponsors in the U.S. House and Senate this month introduced reauthorizing legislation funding for The Esther Martinez Native American Language Act, first passed by Congress in 2006 and funded in 2008 through amendments to the Native American Programs Act of 1974 in order to provide support for Native language immersion and restoration programs in tribal communities.

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Cultural Survival will attend the grand opening of the Eastern Band of Cherokee's language immersion school, New Kituwah Academy, on October 7 near Cherokee, North Carolina. New Kituwah Academy will house Cherokee language preschool and kindergarten classrooms, serving 2 - 5 year olds. The students, who already speak English as their first language, will study English as a discrete subject area, but will be taught all other curriculum content in Cherokee. Eastern Cherokee is an endangered language, with 300 remaining speakers, most over age 50.

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Set amidst rolling prairies and the Badlands, Young Lakota shares with viewers the perspectives of three young Lakota as they find themselves in the middle of political controversy in the small town of Kyle on South Dakota’s Pine Ridge Reservation. The film centers on Sunny Clifford, who has recently returned to Pine Ridge after two years in college and aspires to improve the reservation she grew up on.

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So began Calixta Gabriel, a 32-year old Kaqchikel woman from the northwest region of Guatemala. Her three brothers were assassinated in the 1980s, her family lands destroyed, and her parents forced into a military-designed "model village." She herself sought refugee in the United States in the 1980s.

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On October 21, 1995, Cultural Survival sponsored "Raising the Stakes" Indian Gaming Conference at the Peabody Museum, Harvard University. The event was conceived and coordinated by Directors, Nicholas Ribis and Michelle Traymar, fellows of Cultural Survival. The eight-hour conference was held in order to facilitate dialogue among tribes on the recent controversy over gaming on tribal lands.

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The Lime Village case (Bobby v. Alaska) has often been a focal point in the subsistence debate in Alaska. The federal court's decision in this case guides the actions of the Federal Subsistence Board to this day. It is worthwhile to focus on the Lime Village case because any legal structure that cannot protect or provide adequate security for the Lime village subsistence way of life must be reexamined.

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"Save Our Beach Dem and Our Land Too!" The Problems of Tourism in "America's Paradise"

As you fly into St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, your attention is captured by the changing pattern of brilliant blues and bright greens, where islands interrupt the Caribbean seascape. Leaving the plane, your first impression is a blast of warm, slightly humid air. Ah, vacation has begun! Hey, did you notice the beach right next to the airport? Did you sip on the rum punch, offered to you by smiling hostesses in colorful "native garb" as you entered the airport terminal?

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Underground Railway Theater’s production of Sila will be showing at the Central Square Theater in Cambridge starting April 24, 2014. Playwright Chantal Bilodeau and director Megan Sandberg-Zakian merge Inuit myth with contemporary Arctic policy to use stories of personal significance to show the impact of global warming and climate change.

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"The Trees Will Last Forever": The integrity of their forest signifies the health of the Menominee people When tribal chair Glenn Miller travels, he is proud to say he is Menominee and points to the tribe's forest, which will likely look the same in 500 years as it does now. Not only that, adds David Grignon, a tribal planner. "The forest today is what it was 200 years ago when the Old Ones looked at it. Sometimes I go to just sit there and look around and I know that."

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"Where Are Your Moccasins?" A Guide for Tourists

EY CHIEF!" the sun-reddened, gray-haired tourist called, approaching my husband's kachina doll booth. It had been a great day at the big Indian Market so far. But I had a feeling… "Hey!" he called again, grinning. "What time is it chief?" My Hopi husband lifted his head and set aside his carving knife. I had a barely controllable urge to take it up and brandish it in the greenhorn's flushed face. "Got any idea what time it is?" he asked - again.

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#Frack Off: Indigenous Women Lead Effort Against Fracking

Hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as fracking, is posing a danger to Indigenous communities beyond its damaging environmental impact. First Nations in both Canada and the United State are being hit the hardest, where oil and gas companies with interests in the untapped resources of Indigenous lands are gaining ground.

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'Olelo Hawai'i: A Rich Oral History, a Bright Digital Future

Olelo Hawai'i, the Hawaiian language, has an oral tradition as rich as any language on earth. Prior to the arrival of westerners in the late 1700s, it was the only language spoken in the Hawaiian archipelago. The language flourished in written form as well, after having been assigned Latin characters by Calvinist missionaries in the early 1800s. The Hawaiian nation was among the most literate in the world in the last half of the 19th century.

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Federal Administration for Native Americans (ANA) Funding Opportunities for Native Languages:  Proposals due March 8!

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Promoting Indigenous Language Rights in Practice Wednesday, June 22Language Rights Advocacy Day on Capitol Hill

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On January 30, 2014, two days after President Obama’s State of the Union address, policy makers, elected officials, tribal leaders, and the press convened in a Washington DC studio for the annual State of Indian Nations address. Because stories from Indian country seldom reach national media, the address is a chance for Native leaders to articulate their vision and concerns for their land and people on a national platform.

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Christopher Columbus arrived as an immigrant to "the New World." He did not "discover" America. Today, let's remember and celebrate the People who were here first!

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9/30/1998

Ordinary discourse in Gwich'in Athabascan communities frequently includes the word `subsistence,' but the word itself does not accurately describe most of their social behavior. Activities which also fall into this realm are sharing and trading networks, gift exchanges, and life event celebrations. All of these are linked with hunting, fishing, and harvesting plant materials.

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A Beacon on South Huntington: North American Indian Center of Boston Serves New England’s Native Community

For more than 40 years, Native Americans from the Boston area and around New England have gathered at 105 South Huntington Avenue in Jamaica Plain, MA to find support and embrace their Native heritage. Formerly a girl’s detention center, the building was reincorporated in 1970.

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A Change of Faith for Hmong Refugees

Vang Ger is a practicing Presbyterian. A Hmong woman made refugee by the political events in Laos, she lives in Philadelphia with her husband and children. Her mother, likewise a refugee, lives upstairs. She does not attend church with her daughter. Neither does she perform the animist rituals she was brought up to believe in. She says she would carry on the traditional practices if her husband who is still in Laos were here.

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A Chippewa Case: Resource Control and Self-Determination

In the spring of 1982 the walleye population of Lake Superior congregated in the Chequamegon Bay to begin its annual spawning run up the Kakogon and Bad Rivers on the south shore of the bay. While many observers doubtlessly expected some walleye to fall prey to Indian fishermen's nets, few expected them to be subjected to over-fishing of such an unprecedented scale.

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A Forest of Their Own

In recent years, indigenous people have been awarded title to their own lands in many countries as a result of a well-funded effort by international land conservation organizations. Now, many believe, indigenous peoples can finally determine their own destiny by governing their own lands. But what does the creation of indigenous reserves really mean to indigenous peoples?

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In 2001, change came to Calcedeaver Elementary School in Mount Vernon, Alabama. A new principal introduced a Choctaw language and culture program, and in five years, one of the worst performing schools became one of Alabama’s best.

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Tuesday, April 15, 201412pm-2pmSuffolk University Law SchoolFunction Room, First Floor120 Tremont StreetBoston, MAA panel discussion featuring tribal leaders describing the loss of tribal lands in Massachusetts and its impact still felt today.Lunch will be served.

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A Language Out of Time

Five hundred years ago, the Wampanoag people received a prophecy. It said that the Wampanoag would not be able to keep their language, but that a group of Wampanoag people would leave southern New England taking with them a pipe containing the spirit of language. One day, according to the prophecy, a woman in the East would welcome the language home.

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A Legacy Restored: Another Perspective on the Boldt Decision

Dismantle the legal ruling that restored a fair share of the fishing harvest to Washington State's treaty tribes? Peter Knutson argues "yes" in the spring 1987 issue of Cultural Survival Quarterly 11(2) ("The Unintended Consequences of the Boldt Decision"). Fourteen years after the land-mark ruling, are there problems of equity and legitimacy so severe that the current fishery system should be scrapped? This, by implication, would require overturning the Boldt Decision itself.

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Most would say Daniel Lum has a lot on his plate. The soon-to-be-published author and father of five has bills, rent payments, an occasional family crisis to resolve, friends to help, his parents to assist, his two dogs, and perhaps a move to Anchorage to start a restaurant; but beyond these countless responsibilities, the Inupiaq man magically finds time to fight for the Arctic Ocean.

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