Latest CSQ Articles

Our Indigenous Identities Shaping the Future

In my travels, I am always reminded of the presence of Indigenous Peoples; I know when I am on Indigenous land. I feel and honor the presence of ancestors and pay respect to them along with those I am visiting. Sometimes I can gaze upon sacred landscapes and homelands and understand; other times I gaze upon steel and concrete skyscrapers or other places where Indigenous People live and I feel more conflicted.

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No Stoic Indians: Looking Through the Lens at a Today’s Indigenous World

Seen through the lens of Nadya Kwandibens, being Indigenous in a modern world is a beautiful balance. As a Toronto-based professional photographer and Ojibwe/Anishinaabe of the Northwest Angle #37 First Nation in Ontario, Canada, Kwandibens has spent years capturing the spirit of today’s Indigenous Peoples in a manner that highlights the unique way Native identity intersects with contemporary life.

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Urge Harvard to Be a Responsible Investor

The Iberá wetlands system in Argentina is one of the world’s largest freshwater bodies, but it is under threat. Vast monocrop pine and eucalyptus plantations have virtually eliminated biodiversity in more than half of the wetlands, devastating freshwater levels and dramatically affecting the livelihoods of the Guaraní Indigenous People who have lived in relationship with the lands for generations and depend on these ecosystems. Who's responsible? None other than Harvard University.

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On October 23, 2014, the Shipibo indigenous community of Korin Bari filed a law suit against the Peruvian government for its failure to title its traditional territory resulting in the repeated invasion of community lands by illegal loggers and coca growers threatening the lives of community members who protest.

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Owners of the Water: Conflict and Collaboration Over Rivers ("ö Tede'wa") centers around a protest staged in Nova Xavantina, blocking traffic over a bridge over the Rio das Mortes in Matto Grosso state, central Brazil. Matto Grosso is a biodiverse tropical savanna and Brazil’s largest soy-producing state. The Xavante live primarily in nine small reserves in the Cerrado, “like islands in a sea of soy.”

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