Botswana

Date: February 19, 2013

For the San Bushmen, the ostrich egg is a gift from the gods. Not only does the inside of the egg feed a family, the outside can be used as a water vessel.

Date: February 3, 2011

On January 27, 2011, Botswana’s Court of Appeal reversed a ruling that denied the Kalahari Bushmen access to water on their ancestral lands. The Bushmen appealed a 2010 High Court judgment that prevented them from accessing a borehole. The new ruling not only gave the Bushmen rights to use the borehole, but also gave them the right to drill new ones and ordered the government to pay the Bushmen’s court costs.   

In 2002, the Botswana government forced the Bushmen from their lands in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve and into what amounted to refugee camps.

Date: August 13, 2010

The Healing Spirit

For the Kalahari Bushmen, if you’re sick, it’s time for the community to sing, clap, and dance to bring on the spirit to the medicine man so he can heal you. Although the ancestors are gender-neutral about who is powerful enough to hold the spirit, there are more men who take on the role, and many who feel the spirit is too hot to handle.

Date: July 30, 2010

On July 21, the Botswana High Court ruled against the San Bushmen, barring them from re-opening a vital waterhole in the Kalahari desert, which is key to their way of life and survival.

The Botswana government has been trying to push the San out of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve since diamonds were found there in the 1980s. The government sealed the Bushmen’s water borehole when it evicted them from the reserve in 2002.

Date: May 26, 2010

When compared to the Americas, African practice on indigenous rights protection is unguided by law.

Date: May 7, 2010

Indigenous Activists Tell Cultural Survival What The Decade Meant To Them

The San of southern Africa have made important steps during the International Decade of the World’s Indigenous People.

The Working Group of Indigenous Minorities in Southern Africa (WIMSA) was set up in 1996 to support, lobby for, and network among San communities in South Africa, Angola, Namibia, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and Botswana. Since its inception, it has assisted the San in fighting for their basic human rights.

Date: May 7, 2010

Oma Djo, a highly respected elderly Ju/’hoan healer, referred to n/om spiritual energy as something that “helps keep us alive.” N/om lies at the heart of the Ju/’hoan practice of healing, a practice that follows the pattern of classical shamanism. During all-night community healing dances, n/om boils within the healers to create an altered state of consciousness (ASC) called !aia.

Date: April 28, 2010

On February 12-13, 2002, representatives of the various San organizations from across southern Africa met with representatives of the World Bank in Windhoek, Namibia to discuss issues surrounding the World Bank's indigenous peoples policy (see also CSQ 25:4). This meeting is one of several to be held with indigenous peoples' organizations in Africa by the World Bank, which is making a concerted effort to consult with indigenous organizations to assess their reactions to its revised policy.

Date: April 28, 2010

At the Regional Conference on Development Programmes for Africa’s San Populations held in Windhoek, Namibia, in 1992, the San representatives resolved that "San peoples should be assisted to form committees to represent themselves at local, regional and international levels." (Government of the Republic of Namibia, 1992) This need was reiterated during a follow-up conference held in Gaborone, Botswana, in 1993, where the San delegates called on national governments "to support the formation of Basarwa national for a." (Government of Botswana, 1993) A needs assessment study in 1994, involvin

Date: April 28, 2010

The San were colonized both by the Bantu tribes who moved south from eastern Africa and by the Europeans who forced their way northward from the Cape. These land-hungry pastoralist groups dispossessed the San of their land base and natural resources. The dispossession continues, even under the independent governments of Namibia and Botswana, through so-called integration and resettlement processes.

Date: April 28, 2010

The government’s intention to relocate the San out of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve (CKGR) was announced in 1995.

Date: April 28, 2010

San art at D’Kar and Schmidtsdrift is produced in each village by about a dozen artists, men and women, under the auspices of the Kuru Development Trust and the !Xu and Khwe Trust, respectively. Displayed as “Bushman art,” sometimes in conjunction with rock art (to which the contemporary art has a superficial resemblance but no cultural connection), San art becomes a mechanism for self-representation.

Date: April 28, 2010

In March 1999, the world media carried a picture of South African President Thabo Mbeki embracing Dawid Kruiper, leader of the ‡Khomani San.

Date: April 28, 2010

Starting in 1986, Kuru developed a strategy of empowering the San through a holistic approach to development.

Date: April 28, 2010

Since its inception in 1973, KPF has responded to several requests for help made by San, Nama, and other rural southern African communities by raising funds and providing technical and advisory assistance.

Date: April 28, 2010

Despite an international campaign protesting the removals, the Government of Botswana has since 1997 moved more than 1,000 of 1,700 ethnic |Gui, ||Gana, and Kgalagadi residents out of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve (CKGR).

Date: April 28, 2010

There exist as many different musical legacies as there are different populations of San people; nevertheless, they share many traits.

Date: April 28, 2010

The University of Tromsø and the University of Botswana Collaborative Program for San (Basarwa) Research and Capacity Building (UT-UB) combines ongoing research (on the cultural, historical, linguistic, economic and legal situation of the San) with San capacity-building. The project encourages a comparative perspective on indigenous peoples, drawing on the experience of the University of Tromsø and its Centre for Saami Studies, as well as South-South links with the University of Namibia (UNAM) and the University of Western Cape (UWC).

The program’s specific objectives are:

Date: April 28, 2010

"Look at the land--it is sick and dying now that we are not allowed in it anymore," commented Kebuelemang, the 70-year-old headman of Mababe village, as he pointed westward. Within a kilometer of their village lay the vast Chobe National Park, established by the colonial government in 1960.

Date: April 28, 2010

In 1963 perhaps three-quarters of the 466 Dobe Ju|’hoansi were living in camps based primarily on hunting and gathering while the rest were attached to Black-owned cattle posts.