15.3 (Fall 1991) Intellectual Property Rights: The Politics of Ownership

Date: March 4, 2010

With this issues, Cultural Survival Quarterly begins its tenth year. And in 1992, Cultural Survival, Inc, will be twenty. Over these time spans, the magazine and the organization have come into their own, making this a fit time to reflect on where we have come and where we are going.

For a decade, CSQ has been Cultural Survival's face to the world Quarterly have changed US, British, French, Canadian, and German policies toward such countries as Ethiopia, Guatemala, Peru, Sudan, and Uganda.

Date: March 4, 2010

The Source of Our Cures: A new pharmaceutical company wants to provide. reciprocal benefits and recognize the value of indigenous knowledge

FOR 500 YEARS, SINCE THE People of South America encountered Europeans on their soil, the global pharmacopoeia has been enriched by a number of important plant-derived medicines discovered and utilized by indigenous people.

The skeletal muscle relaxant d-tubocurarine is derived from an Amazonian arrow poison better known as curare, Chonodendron tomentosum.

Date: March 4, 2010

IN FEBRUARY 1988 PIO CRUZ AND Cristina Bubba, representatives of the Aymara community of Coroma, Bolivia, arrived in San Francisco.

Date: March 4, 2010

The Antiquities of Nepal: It is time to start listening to communities. whose possessions have become objects of international consumption

It is not seemly nor of good report

Date: March 4, 2010

Singing Other Peoples' Songs: Indigenous songs are often considered. "public domain"-yet a mainstream musician can turn them into "individual property"

WHEN MY WIFE, JUDY, AND I were doing field research among the Suy Indians in Mato Grosso, Brazil, we all sang together a lot. Between 1970 and 1982 the Suy learned many of our songs - just as they had learned the songs of more than 10 "foreign" cultures before we appeared - and we sang theirs.

Date: March 3, 2010

Power and Patronage in the Philippines: Environmental and cultural. survival in Palawan Province

IT IS NOT SURPRISING THAT Organizations concerned with the environment, conservation, and human rights are converging on a common strategy to protect both natural resources and cultural groups in tropical forest ecosystems. The strategy involves obtaining legal rights for ethnic groups to the land and resources on which they have traditionally depended. The idea is that the traditional owners of the land will, as they always have, manage the resources sensibly and sustainably.

Date: March 3, 2010

Oasis of Hope: Sahrawi refugee camps in Western Sahara bear the fruits of. self-sufficiency amid a harsh environment

Date: March 3, 2010

IN A RECENT ARTICLE, THE Mexican novelist Carlos Fuentes denounced the US invasion of Panama as the Bush Administration's declaration of its intent to hunt whomever, whatever, and wherever it likes in Latin America. Fuentes warned, "If we do not post `No Hunting' signs, our lands will be poached on. We must set up our signs quickly and be prepared to enforce them with prudence and a firm will."

Of course, the United States has been stalking political prey in Latin America for many years now.

Date: March 3, 2010

Massacre in Santiago Atitlán: A turning point in the Maya struggle?

Date: March 3, 2010

Nineteen ninety-two promises to be a turning point in national and international politics. Here in the United States, a presidential campaign will take a place at a time when revolutionary changes are sweeping the international community. The quality of life for working and middle class citizens is in rapid decline. US foreign and domestic policies face unprecedented challenges in addressing pressing environmental, economic, and social agendas.

Date: March 3, 2010

IN THE AFTERMATH OF CIVIL WAR, Liberia's urban and rural peoples alike face a daunting burden of national reconstruction: restarting self-sufficient rural agriculture, providing health care for the war's victims, and restoring the national economy, to name a few (Thomasson 1990). Indigenous knowledge systems can contribute to recovery and maintain and enhance the lives of Liberia's nonurban peoples. In particular, traditional seeds and traditional metallurgy can play vital roles in rebuilding the agricultural sector.

Date: March 3, 2010

In our consumer-happy Western society, physical property - as well as intellectual property - are commodities to buy, sell, and own. Western law allows us to patent and copyright the products of our thoughts, and we are outraged when the fruits of our mental labor are stolen by others.

Date: March 3, 2010

THE DEVELOPING WORLD IS home to the bulk of the world's genetic diversity and customary knowledge of plant uses.

Date: March 3, 2010

Folklore, Tradition, or Know-How? The ethnopharmacological approach to. drug discovery depends on our ability to value non-Western knowledge of medicinal plants

Date: March 3, 2010

CURRENTLY, NO INTERNATIONAL convention is discussing the question of intellectual property rights (IPR) for indigenous people. Some progress is being made toward that goal, however.

Date: March 3, 2010

Algonquin of Barriere Lake

Date: March 3, 2010

ALARMED BY REPORTS OF THE desperate situation of the Yanomami of Brazil, the American Anthropological Association resolved to take the unprecedented step of appointing a special commission to investigate matters and recommend actions in support of the Yanomami. Davi Kopenawa Yanomami, the chief spokesman and leader of the Brazilian Yanomami, served as a consultant to the commission; this interview was recorded as his contribution to its support. Turner, who traveled to Boa Vista as chair of the AAA commission, conducted the interview in Portuguese.