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For more than 30 years Cultural Survival has been the most trusted and comprehensive source of information on indigenous issues in the world. And all of that information, thousands of pages and hundreds of articles, is available on this website.  Simply enter a search term in the box at the top of this page and begin your journey.

 

Latest CSQ Articles

Bringing a Xavante Healer’s Dream to Life

Inspired by a healer’s dream and prescient vision that destruction of the Brazilian cerrado (savannah) is endangering the red pi’ã, the bird that warns Xavante of impending danger, leader and activist Hiparidi Top’tiro sprang into action. In 2006 he founded the Mobilization of Indigenous Peoples of the Cerrado, a coalition of diverse peoples that pressures the government to implement environmental protections for the cerrado equivalent to those in place for Amazonia.

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Celebrating Indigenous Tibetan and Himalayan Arts and Cultures Bomdonn Ngodup

Tucked away in the heart of Porter Square in Cambridge, MA, the Tibet Arts Gallery provides a calming and spiritual presence for all who visit. Run by entrepreneur and Cultural Survival Bazaar vendor Bomdonn Ngodup, Tibet Arts Gallery buys directly from Indigenous Tibetan and Himalayan artisans in order to maintain and celebrate their Indigenous culture and heritage.

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Latest News

On October 23, 2014, the Shipibo indigenous community of Korin Bari filed a law suit against the Peruvian government for its failure to title its traditional territory resulting in the repeated invasion of community lands by illegal loggers and coca growers threatening the lives of community members who protest.

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Owners of the Water: Conflict and Collaboration Over Rivers ("ö Tede'wa") centers around a protest staged in Nova Xavantina, blocking traffic over a bridge over the Rio das Mortes in Matto Grosso state, central Brazil. Matto Grosso is a biodiverse tropical savanna and Brazil’s largest soy-producing state. The Xavante live primarily in nine small reserves in the Cerrado, “like islands in a sea of soy.”

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