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For more than 30 years Cultural Survival has been the most trusted and comprehensive source of information on indigenous issues in the world. And all of that information, thousands of pages and hundreds of articles, is available on this website.  Simply enter a search term in the box at the top of this page and begin your journey.

 

Latest CSQ Articles

The UN World Conference on Indigenous Peoples: A high-level meeting with a low level outcome?

The so-called UN World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, to be held this year on September 22–23, is really a High Level Plenary Meeting of the General Assembly. No one should be fooled by the title. It will have color and pageantry supplied by the Indigenous Peoples who attend, and the General Assembly hall and rooms will be filled with Indigenous representatives dressed in their traditional regalia. But this was not the original intent.

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A Model for Sustainability—Thinking In Terms of Thousands of Years

Our series spotlighting the work of our Board members continues with Stephen P. Marks, the François-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of Health and Human Rights at the Harvard School of Public Health. Marks is the director of the Program on Human Rights in Development at Harvard University, and is affiliated with the Committee on Ethnicity, Migration, Rights; the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative; and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, among others.

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Owners of the Water: Conflict and Collaboration Over Rivers ("ö Tede'wa") centers around a protest staged in Nova Xavantina, blocking traffic over a bridge over the Rio das Mortes in Matto Grosso state, central Brazil. Matto Grosso is a biodiverse tropical savanna and Brazil’s largest soy-producing state. The Xavante live primarily in nine small reserves in the Cerrado, “like islands in a sea of soy.”

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On October 12th, Tsilhqot’in People gathered at Fish Lake in British Colombia to inaugurate a totem pole at a new conservation area covering 800,000 acres to be managed by the Tsilhqot’in First Nation of Canada. The park, whose official name is Dasiqox Tribal Park, is known as ‘Nexwagwez?an’ , meaning “it is there for us” in the Tsilhoqot’in language.

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