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For more than 30 years Cultural Survival has been the most trusted and comprehensive source of information on indigenous issues in the world. And all of that information, thousands of pages and hundreds of articles, is available on this website.  Simply enter a search term in the box at the top of this page and begin your journey.

 

Latest CSQ Articles

No Stoic Indians: Looking Through the Lens at a Today’s Indigenous World

Seen through the lens of Nadya Kwandibens, being Indigenous in a modern world is a beautiful balance. As a Toronto-based professional photographer and Ojibwe/Anishinaabe of the Northwest Angle #37 First Nation in Ontario, Canada, Kwandibens has spent years capturing the spirit of today’s Indigenous Peoples in a manner that highlights the unique way Native identity intersects with contemporary life.

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Celebrating Indigenous Tibetan and Himalayan Arts and Cultures Bomdonn Ngodup

Tucked away in the heart of Porter Square in Cambridge, MA, the Tibet Arts Gallery provides a calming and spiritual presence for all who visit. Run by entrepreneur and Cultural Survival Bazaar vendor Bomdonn Ngodup, Tibet Arts Gallery buys directly from Indigenous Tibetan and Himalayan artisans in order to maintain and celebrate their Indigenous culture and heritage.

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Latest News

Owners of the Water: Conflict and Collaboration Over Rivers ("ö Tede'wa") centers around a protest staged in Nova Xavantina, blocking traffic over a bridge over the Rio das Mortes in Matto Grosso state, central Brazil. Matto Grosso is a biodiverse tropical savanna and Brazil’s largest soy-producing state. The Xavante live primarily in nine small reserves in the Cerrado, “like islands in a sea of soy.”

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On October 12th, Tsilhqot’in People gathered at Fish Lake in British Colombia to inaugurate a totem pole at a new conservation area covering 800,000 acres to be managed by the Tsilhqot’in First Nation of Canada. The park, whose official name is Dasiqox Tribal Park, is known as ‘Nexwagwez?an’ , meaning “it is there for us” in the Tsilhoqot’in language.

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