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In the absence of an Indigenous rights treaty body, the UN Committee on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (CESCR) has discussed many of the issues involving Indigenous Peoples in the reviews of applicable countries. Guatemala, whose Mayan population accounts for an estimated 51 percent of its total population, has historically had many issues regarding Indigenous Peoples. During Guatemala’s third review of its commitment to the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights on November 18, 2014 during the CESCR's 53rd session, Guatemala’s progress on its Indigenous rights issues was at the forefront of the discussion.

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On November 10, 2014 a Colombian Indigenous Court successfully convicted and sentenced seven members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) for their roles in the killings two Nasa Tribe Leaders in Western Colombia. Under national legislation, conflicts within Indigenous territory are tried before an Indigenous Court instead of the State courts of Colombia.

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In 2013, photographer Matika Wilbur embarked on a four-year journey called Project 562 to transform the way the public regards Native Peoples. A member of the Swinomish and Tulalip Tribes and tired of historical inaccuracies and stereotypical images, she sold everything in her Seattle apartment and set off to photograph each of the US’s 566 federally recognized tribes.

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New report finds that US extractive companies expose shareholders to risks by neglecting Indigenous Peoples' rights

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Leer la version en español!November and December are known to be the windiest months in Guatemala; they are also the months characterized by kites, corn pastries and coffee. November 1 marks the Day of the Dead in Guatemala, celebrated by many with visits to the cemetery, with flowers and food to honor their ancestors. Sumpango, Sacatepequez is known to celebrate this festive day with majestic, colorful, giant kites that depict social, environmental and political issues.

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November is Native American month but it is also Membership Month at Cultural Survival, which means it's time to celebrate our members and the good you do around the world in advancing the rights of Indigenous Peoples.

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Climate change impacts people everywhere. Rising temperatures and sea levels are only some of the many ways that carbon emissions and other forms of pollution are affecting the planet. Some countries are combating the ramifications of climate change better than others. After years of reliance, curbing a nation’s dependency on fossil fuels takes time.

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On October 25th in San Mateo, Quetzaltenango Asociacion Mujb’ ab’l yol celebrated the start of a new chapter in the community radio movement. As preparations began with incense, flowers and bright candles for a traditional mayan ceremony, radio broadcasters gathered from all over Guatemala to take part in this celebration.

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By Tar Sands BlockadeTraditional Dineh (Navajo) elders are under attack by federal law enforcement! There have been multiple arrests and approx. 200 of their sheep and goats have been confiscated.

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The month of September was an exciting month for New York City as several historic events took place right on the little island of Manhattan. Cultural Survival had the unique opportunity to participate in several events that reconstructed the role of indigenous people in regards to important issues such as climate change. The first of many exciting events was the first ever, People’s Climate March, the biggest march of its kind with over 400,000 people in attendance.

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This exhibition of 26 Indigenous artists living in N.Y.C. is on display at the Arts Horizons LeRoy Neiman Art Center (AHLNAC), 2875 Frederick Douglas Blvd. and 148th St. from October 13 - December 19, 2014.

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On October 23, 2014, the Shipibo indigenous community of Korin Bari filed a law suit against the Peruvian government for its failure to title its traditional territory resulting in the repeated invasion of community lands by illegal loggers and coca growers threatening the lives of community members who protest.

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