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In 1979, Maybury-Lewis and James Howe submitted a report The Indian Peoples of Paraguay: Their Plight and their Prospects to USAID based on an investigation of the condition of the Aché and Guaraní people and the reports of genocide in eastern Paraguay. In 1980, Cultural Survival published the report. According to Maybury-Lewis and Howe, “The greatest proven faults of the Paraguayan government relative to the Aché were sins of omission rather that commission – its failure to protect the Aché from their persecutors, on and off the reservation, its failure to prosecute Pereira and known Ache̕-hunters, and its failure to liberate those Aché being held in servitude…. It can be argued that failure to protect a people against repeated murderous attacks, whether or not they are genocidal in intent, constitutes complicity in de facto genocide (see Smith and Meli̕a’s discussion, 1978). Under any name, tolerance of such attacks is inexcusable. The charge that the Paraguayan government has had an official policy of genocide against the Indians seems to us unlikely as well as unproven.”

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In comparison to other sources of energy like coal and oil, geothermal energy is generally considered environmentally friendly. Even though there are a few polluting aspects of harnessing geothermal energy[1]. Perhaps this is the reason the Kenya Government has embarked on a major explatory process in the Rift Valley to harness the potential of massive deposits. The prospects from south to north are Lake Magadi, Suswa, Longonot, Olkaria, Eburru, Badlands, Menengai, Arus Bogoria, Lake Baringo,Korosi, Paka, Silali, Emuruangogolak, Namarunu and Barrier[2].

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By Sophia MitrokostasIn 2008, Eyak became the first Native language declared extinct in Alaska. Now, with the help of the internet and a grant from the Administration for Native Americans, Eyak is also on its way to becoming the first language in the state to be brought back to life.

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A.J. Perry’s second novel, The Old People, is not a page-turner. And it doesn’t seek to be. Situated in an indeterminate time and locale, Perry’s novel details the ways of the eponymous Old People. This community has simple needs: rope, fire, hewn stone and, perhaps most importantly, knots.

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Ben Koissaba’s “E-Learning Principles and Practices in the Context of Indigenous Peoples: A Comparative Study” focuses on how access to e-technology has bolstered the agency and global presence of Indigenous People. He draws his assertions from case studies in Australia, the United States, and Kenya.

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For forty-eight years, the Smithsonian Institution has been fostering creativity and learning by sponsoring and presenting the free Smithsonian Folklife Festival which occurs annually on the National Mall in Washington D.C. This year, the festival occurred from June 25-29and starts again on July 2 through July 6.

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In a decision delivered on Thursday, June 26, 2014, Canada’s Supreme Court has granted aboriginal title to the Tsilhqot’in Nation of British Colombia for 1,700 square kilometers of land that they can prove they have traditionally occupied or used for hunting, fishing, or spiritual ceremonies.

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June 26th, 2014, Punta Gorda Town. One year after the decisive judgment of the Belize Court of Appeal that upheld Maya Customary Land Rights, Maya people of the 39 villages in southern Belize came together at Indian Creek village, Toledo. This was The Gathering of the Children of the Earth. This historic event led by the Toledo Alcaldes Association and the Maya Leaders Alliance is an affirmation of the Maya Peoples solidarity for creating a more dignified and just Belize!

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On June 23, 2014, 7 Toj in the Mayan calendar, Indigenous groups from all over Guatemala took part in national protests and roadblocks to bring attention to the continued discrimination and injustice faced by the Indigenous Peoples of Guatemala. Among the main priorities on the list of grievances were the discriminatory telecommunications laws and the mining and hydroelectric companies exploiting Indigenous territories.

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Jumping right into her new position as program assistant, Cultural Survival’s newest team member, Ingrid Sub Cuc, visited three community radio stations in Sololá and one in Sumpango this past week. Her first stop was in San Pedro La Laguna, Sololá where she visited Radio Sembrador and Radio La Voz de San Pedro. The day was filled with information, history, discussion and new friendships. 

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