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The fourteenth session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII) was held from April 20 to May 1, 2015. At this crucial meeting, the Permanent Forum brought together delegates, State representatives, and experts to discuss a wide range of issues affecting Indigenous Peoples, and how States, communities, and United Nations agencies can work together to improve the lives of Indigenous Peoples and to advocate for their rights. The recently released report from the fourteenth session calls particular attention to the problem of suicide among Indigenous youth, to Indigenous Peoples living in the Pacific region, and to the negative effects that climate change could have on Indigenous Peoples around the world.

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On Wednesday June 10, 2015, Joshua Cooper, from the University of Hawaii, led a workshop at Cultural Survival about the UN's Universal Periodic Review process focusing on United States' recent review. The UPR is a process conducted at the United Nations in Geneva that reviews each UN member state’s record with regard to its human rights obligations and commitments.

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Miguel Facussé, one of the richest men in Honduras, died on June 22 at age 90. There is no doubt that he will leave behind an impressive legacy. Dinant, Facussé’s multi-million dollar company that manufactures and markets snack products, detergents and biofuels such as African Palm oil, announced Facussé’s death and praised his creation of economic opportunities in Honduras. The true legacy of Miguel Facussé, however, is felt not in the economic opportunities he created, but in the danger and harassment that his business operations. Locally he is known as "the palm plantation owner of death,

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In December of 2014, new funding laws in Australia began to threaten the existence of 150 remote aboriginal Australian communities throughout the country, with the largest concentration in Western Australia. The federal government claimed that it could no longer support the communities and as of June 30, 2015, no federal funding would be available for the maintenance of rural outback communities.

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In May of 2012, three members of the Kuy, an indigenous people of Cambodia, visited the United States to seek help from the international community in the fight against the destruction of their forest, Prey Lang. In Washington D.C., the team of environmental activists attended a reception hosted by Amnesty International and met with the Cambodian Ambassador. The group also spoke with UN officials in New York.

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In Santa Cruz Barillas in Huehuetenago, Guatemala, another prominent voice in the fight against Hidralia Energia - Hidra Santa Cruz, was detained as a political prisoner by Guatemalan officials without evidence. Bernardo Ermitaño López Reyes, known as Don Taño, is a valiant advocate for Indigenous rights, willing to confront those who oppose the village’s plights face-to-face. He was detained in an arbitrary arrest without evidence, where his constitutional and human rights were not respected.

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On May 26, 2015, the Passamaquoddy and Penobscot Tribal delegates—Matthew Dana II and Wayne Mitchell, respectively—withdrew from the Maine legislature. Their reasons for doing so were a long list of grievances against the state of Maine involving fishing rights and, by extension, rights to Tribal sovereignty. These violations of Penobscot and Passamaquoddy rights undermined what should have been an equal, not subordinate, relationship with the state.

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On June 9th and 10th, 2015, Asociación Sobrevivencia Cultural (ASC), Cultural Survival’s sister organization in Guatemala, conducted a two-day exchange among seven community radios from El Salvador and Guatemala. As part of a generous grant from the Swift Foundation, ASC selected four community radios in Guatemala to travel to El Salvador and visit, as well as learn about the work of, three community stations in El Salvador.

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International human rights organizations Cultural Survival and Rainforest Foundation US stand behind Maya Leaders as they Peacefully Protect their Lands.

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Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) has concluded, in a summary of their final report released June 2, 2015, that residential schools amounted to “cultural genocide” of First Nations peoples. Residential schools existed in Canada between the 1870s and 1996, when the last school closed; in the 150 years of their existence, an estimated 150,000 Indigenous children were sent to the schools, often against the wishes of their parents.

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On June 15th, the Supreme Court of the United States agreed to hear the first Tribal jurisdiction case in 7 years. The Dollar General Corporation operates a store on land which belongs to the Mississippi Choctaw reservation; the Tribe issued a license to the store for use of the land.

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On June 11 and 12, 2015, Asociacion Waqib’ Kej hosted the Third Annual Indigenous Youth Gathering in Chimaltenango, Guatemala. These events target Indigenous youth to discuss the current political situation of Guatemala and the role Indigenous youth have and will continue to play. A fourth gathering is scheduled to be held in the western region of the country next month.

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