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Baka Gbine, a Baka Pygmy music group from southeast Cameroon, will perform for international audiences for the first time in a series of concerts scheduled for April and May in England, Survival International reports. Baka Gbine, who traditionally perform at weddings and funerals, are composed of seven male and female musicians and dancers. The group will tour with Baka Beyond, an Afro-Celtic group based in England, to promote the release of their album, Gati Bongo. The album is slated for wide release on April 24.

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On behalf of the the Oroko, Bakossi, and Upper Bayang peoples in the Ndian, Koupé-Manengouba, and Manyu divisions of Cameroon, last week Cultural Survival delivered statements and petitions with 800 signatures from community members to Bruce Wrobel, CEO of Herakles Farms and Delilah Rothenberg, Herakles Farms Project Director at the company's headquarters in New York City. The petition opposes Herakles Farms palm oil development.

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The proposed 76,000 hectare palm oil plantation in Southwest Cameroon by New York based Herakles Farms has been a major source of controversy since the project was announced in 2009.Recently, the controversy was centered on the Cameroonian government's decision to lift a suspension of the project with no explanation after issuing it just two weeks earlier.

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Herakles Farms has withdrawn their application to the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) for their palm oil plantation in the Southwest region of Cameroon.  The RSPO is a group that certifies palm oil plantations as fulfilling rules for basic environmental sustainability and responsibility towards stakeholders.

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Two local protests broke out in the Southwest region of Cameroon this summer in opposition to the New York based company Herakles’ Farms, who have already planted nurseries for their proposed palm oil plantation.  In the village of Fabe, one of the communities hosting a nursery, a revolt was staged against the company.  Protestors blocked the entrance to the nursery, telling workers that they had put a curse on the seedlings, scaring off all the workers. 

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Cultural Survival is accompanied by Greenpeace and dozens of other organizations in calling for Herakles Farms to own up to their abuses in Cameroon. Read the following release by Greenpeace on their new report- "Herakles: A showcase in bad palm oil production" and video (below), and take action by writing to Herakles directly. 

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Herakles Farms palm oil plantation in Cameroon has found itself on unsteady terms with the government of Cameroon, as they were temporarily ordered to suspend work on their plantation over the past two months.

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Misleading of investors and corruption are just two of the deceitful tactics believed to be employed by New York-based agribusiness company Herakles Farms as it attempts to clear tens of thousands of hectares of Cameroonian rainforest for a large palm oil plantation, according to a new report from the Oakland Institute and Greenpeace International.

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Global Exchange has compiled a list of the top ten “most wanted” corporations of 2013 based on issues like unlivable working conditions, corporate seizures of Indigenous lands, and contaminating the environment, just to name a few. 

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The lead up to this summer’s World Cup is already dominating international news with every manager’s squad selection being scrutinized while analysts attempt to predict the tournament’s winner.Greenpeace has been closely monitoring another world-wide phenomenon: illegal deforestation.

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Amsterdam, 27 May 2014 - Illegal and corrupt behaviour by foreign-owned companies engaged in establishing large palm oil plantations not only threatens local communities and forested areas throughout west and central Africa, but will seriously undermine legislation being set up between African countries and the European Union to prevent just that says Greenpeace International.

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The following editorial by Samuel Nguiffo was published in Al Jazeera on April 14th.Samuel Nguiffo is the Secretary General of the Centre for Environment and Development (CED), Cameroon, and a recipient of the Goldman Environmental Prize in 1999.  He is currently being sued by the government of Cameroon for tarnishing the state's reputation when he advocated against an oil palm plantation concession.

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The Court of First Instance Limbe has fined the New York based palm oil company US$4.5 Million after a lawsuit filed by former executive Blessed Okoye for his wrongful termination.

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 Nasako Besingi, the director of Struggle to Economise Future Environment (SEFE), one of our coalition partners on the ground in Cameroon, was arrested November 14th along with five others in the town of Mundemba, Cameroon.Local and international pressure was successful in releasing the activists after being held for two days with no charge.

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Greenpeace Africa and the Oakland Institute are alarmed by the decision of the Cameroonian government to award US agribusiness company Herakles Farms a three-year provisional land lease to develop a palm oil plantation in the South West region of the country. The move disproves Herakles Farms’ claim that it had all the necessary permits from the start, and confirms that the company has in fact been operating illegally for more than three years.

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Herakles Farms, a US company, has been chopping down miles of dense forest without the full authority to do so -- and in the face of desperate pleas and resistance from local communities.The palm oil project will also destroy precious chimpanzee and forest elephant habitat if it goes ahead.

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The endangered Chimpanzee stands to have swathes of its forest habitat in Cameroon destroyed if a US company's controversial plans to establish a palm oil plantation in the area are not stopped.

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A Cameroonian judge in the Fako High Court has awarded former Herakles Farm employee Loxly Massango Epie 2.3 billion CFA (4.8 million USD) in a lawsuit claiming racial discrimination a

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There are probably more refugees in the world today than at any other time in modern history. Nearly half of the world's 10 to 13 million refugees are scattered throughout the African continent. WHAT IS REFUGEE? According to the 1951 Geneva Convention a refugee is any person who:

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Indian Girls Make the Best Maids

FOR more than thirty years, the Amuesha Indian community of Miraflores (Oxapampa, Peru) has provided young girls as servants to neighboring haciendas and the homes of the region's lumber barons. During the past ten years, as the demand for servants in the urban areas has grown, more and more Amuesha girls have been taken to Lima to work in middle class homes.

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Intellectual Property Responsibilities

In the Fulani village of Bainjong in Cameroon, a calf afflicted by an infectious disease is treated with a preparation that begins with the harvesting of certain mistletoe leaves; ethnoveterinarian Ardo Umaruis completes this task early in the morning before speaking to anyone. He pounds the leaves into a dry powder and washes a verse from the Koran, written in Arabic ink on a Koranic board, into the powder.

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Introduction - 6.4

The reach into the aesthetic worlds of other cultures spans centuries. Today, a variety of motives incite Western interests in Third World arts and crafts. Multinational corporations, tourists, individual entrepreneurs, private and museum collectors are all appropriators of fine "high" art or its imitations as well as handicrafts, both the rare and the mass-produced. Ethnic arts and crafts have found a permanent home in many developed nations, influencing Western tastes and production.

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No Longer Nomadic: Changing Punan Tubu Lifestyle Requires New Health Strategies

Over the past half-century tropical humid forests have undergone unprecedented pressure to make way for people, often at the cost of ecological functions that may affect human health. The role of deforestation in the increase in infectious diseases is the most obvious direct health impact, but more indirect consequences should not be underestimated. In the long term, deforestation causes losses of potential medicines and increases in pollutants.

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The insecurity the Bakola and Bagyeli Pygmies in Cameroon’s Ocean Department are facing due to a new pipeline is an experience that has been shared by many indigenous peoples around the world. But the pipeline is not the Bakola and Bagyeli’s only concern. A national park to offset the pipeline’s environmental impacts has been established on their traditional hunting and gathering areas, placing their rights under increasing pressure.

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Stories From Home:<br>Mbororo Worked to Improved Education

Indigenous Activists Tell Cultural Survival What The Decade Meant To Them

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The Hagahai: Isolation and Health Status in Papua New Guinea

The Hagahai are a recently contacted group of seminomadic hunter-horticulturalists living in the fringe highlands of Madang Province in Papua New Guinea. Although occasional explorers and miners probably walked through their territory in the Schrader Mountains as early as the 1930s and several attempts were made to census them during the 1970s, the Hagahai effectively remained hidden from mission and government influence until the 1980s.

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Tropical Rainforest Destruction: A Human-Rights Fact Sheet

The Losses * Inappropriate logging and farming have so devasted the rain forest on the Philippine island of Ormoc that it no longer functions as a natural flood barrier. In November 1991, a flash flood left over 3,000 dead and 20,000 homeless.

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Where Money is Law

On May 10, 2013, Musa Usman Ndamba, Vice President of MBOSCUDA (Mbororo Social and Cultural Development Association) was put on trial before the Court of First Instance in Bamenda, Cameroon. He was put on trial for the crimes of defamation committed by one Musa Adamu against a powerful billionaire rancher and landowner in the N.W Region of Cameroon (Alhadji Baba Ahmadou Danpullo).

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wodaabe

Location, Land, and Climate Wodaabe are nomads, migrating through much of the Sahel from northern Cameroon to Chad, Niger, and northeast Nigeria. The last nomads in the area, the Wodaabe number between 160,000 and 200,000. Other around them - the Hausa, Fulani, and Tuaeg - regard the Wodaabe as wild people. The Wodaabe refer to the Fulani with equal disdain as Wodaabe who lost their way.

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