share

Armed Struggle and Indigenous People

The two CSQ issues on militarization and indigenous peoples are intended to acquaint our readers with the important role militarization plays in the lives of even the most isolated tribal groups. The articles contained in these issues focus mostly on the consequences of shooting wars and on the increasing number of groups involved in them, directly or indirectly. This increasingly militarized world also affects the lives of indigenous peoples in a number of other important ways.

Read more

Attacks Continue on Indigenous People in the Chittagong Hill Tracts

The Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT), an area of 5,093 mi², is an official administrative district in Bangladesh, bordering Burma and northeastern India. It is inhabited by several indigenous groups such as the Marma, Baums and Chakmas, numbering approximately 600,000. They are culturally, racially, ethnically and linguistically distinct from the majority Bengali population of Bangladesh. They form 0.7 percent of the total population of the country.

Read more

The following two articles regard massive protests that took place in Bangladesh yesterday demanding a ban on open pit mining scheduled to break ground in the northwest region of Phulbari.  See Cultural Survival's Action Alert on Bangladesh here to send a letter in solidarity with the Indigenous farmers of this area against the destruction of their land.   

Read more

By Kate Hoshour, IAP Senior Research FellowRoughly 2,000 protesters united to blockade a highway in the Phulbari region this week and demanded that the government honor a six-point agreement, signed on August 31, 2006. 

Read more

TAKE ACTION At least 2,000 demonstrators blockaded a major highway in northwest Bangladesh last week to protest government plans for open pit coal mining in Phulbari and nearby Barapukuria and demand compensation for lost crops and the destruction of their lands.

Read more

An indigenous Garo youth was killed on January 3 by forest guards during a protest of the Ministry of Environment’s Botanical Garden and Eco-Park in the Modhupur forest of the Chandranath Hills.[1] Although no specific individuals are presently accused, the Modhupur forest people blame Bangladesh Nationalist Party members for intimidating indigenous protestors from agitating against the Eco-Park.

Read more

On Tuesday, December 9th, 2014, Bangladeshi activists, in conjunction with a diverse group of environmental and left political activists in London, heckled the investors of Global Coal Management Resources by their noise demo and coal play. Activists blocked the entrance to the Aeronautical Society by dumping coal in the doorway. They surrounded GCMs’ CEO Gary Lye and his fellows who are aggressively moving ahead to implement a massive open-pit mine in Phulbari, the northwest region of Bangladesh. At the same time a delegation of protesters disrupted the AGM of GCM by questioning the investors inside the AGM about their fraudulent business in London’s Alternative Share Market (AIM)

Read more

London-based multinational company, GCM Resources Plc, is desperately moving to implement an immense open pit coal mine in northwest Bangladesh, forcibly displacing an estimated 130,000 people and destroying the homes, lands, and water sources of as many as 220,000 people.  On November 26, 2014, the company’s CEO, Gary Lye, attempted to conduct consultation with locals in Phulbari and was met with angry crowds.  “He had to leave the town in two hours.

Read more

briefly noted - 16.1

Congo Project Draws Fire

Read more

Eighty-five organizations, including Cultural Survival, sent a letter sent to investors, urging them to withhold financing for the Phulbari Coal Project in Bangladesh.  The project is controlled by Global Coal Management Resources plc (GCM), a London-based company,  and its largest investor is Polo Resources, of South Africa.  The letter  is signed by leading human rights and environmental organizations based in 25 countries. It identifies a wide range of serious human rights violations and environmental risks associated with the project.  Download the letter, attached below. 

Read more

International Accountability Project published a critical analysis of GCM's Indigenous Peoples Development Plan for the Phulbari Coal Project.

Read more

On December 15th, GCM held its annual shareholders’ meeting in London, amidst throngs of protesters demonstrating outside the building.  Protesters waved banners tagging the project as”modern day colonialism,” and carried “eviction notices” from the people of Bangladesh telling the company to abandon the Phulbari Coal project and leave the country, according to a report from the news site Morning Star.

Read more

Two thousand Bangladeshi citizens blocked major highways and railways for six hours on March 28 and demanded a response from the prime minister by April 11. They are calling on her to honor a 2006 agreement to ban open-pit coal mining in the country. For seven years, Bangladeshi citizens, including the National Indigenous Union (Jatiya Adivasi Parishad) have fiercely protested a British company’s plan for open-pit mining in Phulbari.

Read more

A recent article, “Displacing People For Profit: Obama Administration Supports Controversial Coal Project in Bangladesh,” written by Christine Shearer and Joshua Frank and published by Alert Net delves into the Obama administration's role in supporting the controversial Phulbari coal mine in Bangaldesh, despite years of protest by local Indigenous re

Read more

In a protest to defend the natural resources of Bangladesh on December 29th, more than 35 people were left injured after police confronted the activists with batons and tear gas. The demonstration aimed to pressure the Bangladesh Ministry of Power and Energy to accept a set of seven demands, including the cancellation of concessions to build the Phulbari open-pit coal mine as well the eviction of GCM Resources, the London-based mining company currently financing the Phulbari project.

Read more

Protests were held outside the Annual General Meeting of British mining company GCM Resources on December 4th over the company’s Phulbari coal mine in Bangladesh.  The protests were held by UK solidarity groups the London Mining Network, Phulbari Solidarity Group, and the UK Committee to Protect Oil-Gas and Mineral Resources in Bangladesh.   

Read more

On December 20th, activists protesting an open-pit coal mine in Phulbari, Bangladesh dumped coal at the entrance to mining company GCM Resources in London.

Read more

With the appointment of a new director, the London-based company GCM Resources is redoubling its efforts to install the Phulbari coal mine in Northern Bangladesh, despite calls by the UN for the project’s immediate halt.

Read more

 A panel of experts appointed by the government have concluded after a year of study that the construction of an open-pit mine in the Phulbari region of northern Bangladesh is a “practical approach”.  The 17 member committee, headed by the former chairman of the national oil company of Bangladesh, was formed a year ago to give opinions on the appropriate coal mining and its implications on social and environmental factors.

Read more

The people of Bangladesh continue to protest the construction of a large coal mine in the Northwest region of Phulbari. The mine will displace thousands of Indigenous people and destroy their agricultural lands. Cultural Survival launched a letter-writing campaign in February, 2011 to prevent this mine's construction.

Read more

Chittagong Hill Tribes of Bangladesh

Resource Development and Ethnic Conflict

Read more

Officials of Western governments and international donor agencies such as the United Nations Development Programme and the World Bank will gather in Dhaka next month for the Bangladesh Development Forum. As they forge, and weigh, past and potential commitments to the country, the Peace Campaign Group hopes to draw their attention to the dire situation of the Jumma, the indigenous people of the Chittagong Hill Tracts in southeastern Bangladesh.

Read more

EDITORIAL - 6.4

In 1492, the estimated aboriginal population of greater Amazonia was about 6 million, more than 10 times what it is today. Comparable figures exist for the Philippines, Australia, the Pacific Islands, North and South America, the Caribbean, the Andes, the Southern Cone of South America, and many parts of Africa. Contact with colonizers and subsequent incorporation into nation states has led to the cultural and physical destruction of small societies throughout the world.

Read more

by Kate Hoshour and Christine Shearer  Originally published on TruthOut.org As the sun rose on March 28, 2011, roughly 2,000 people gathered to demonstrate against a mining project that would displace tens of thousands of people in northwest Bangladesh and establish one of the largest open pit coal mines in the world.  

Read more

Ethnic and Religious Conflicts in India

India is characterized by more ethnic and religious groups than most other countries of the world. Aside from the much noted 2000-odd castes, there are eight "major" religions, 15-odd languages spoken in various dialects in 22 states and nine union territories, and a substantial number of tribes and sects.

Read more

GfBV - Gesellschaft für Bedrohte Völker

"Cultural and physical genocide must be opposed wherever it occurs."

Read more

 Cultural Survival joins the International Accountability Project and Bangladeshi organizations in celebrating a victory in the fight against the Phulbari coal mine. On Tuesday, seven United Nations Special Rapporteurs issued a joint press release  calling for an immediate halt to the project due to the many human rights risks and violations it poses.

Read more

Last week, Bangladesh’s National Committee to Protect Oil, Gas, Mineral Resources, and Power and Ports called a strike in Phulbari in the north-west of the country to oppose opencast coal mining in the area by London-listed GCM Resources (formerly Asia Energy). Talks over the weekend led to the cessation of the strike.

Read more

 Amid a flurry of recent protests, strikes, negative press, and shareholder divestment, British coal company GCM Resources’ executive Grahram Taggart resigned last week.The company has plans to construct an open-pit coal mine in Northern Bangladesh that is widely opposed by local Indigenous Peoples, grassroots organizations, environmentalists and UN Special Rapporteurs. 

Read more

Pages