share

Mayan CalendarRead our series on 2012 and hear from Mayan priests on the significance of Oxlajuj Baktun, the end of the “long-count” calendar cycle that finishes up 5,129 years this December 21, 2012.

Walking In Time Towards 2012
The Mayan civilization is one of the cultures that expanded the studies of astronomy, architecture,mathematics, and the arts. Remnants of these studies remain enshrined in the ceremonial centers of Tikal, Palenque and Copan, among others.

2012: Business as Usual
I was visiting the station to learn about the Mayan priests’ expectations and plans for the big Oxlajuj Baktun, the end of the “long-count” calendar cycle that finishes up 5,129 years this December 21, 2012.

2012: End of the World?
In Momostenango, a small town in the highland region of Guatemala, the Quiche Mayan community did not enter the 2012 year dreading doomsday predictions. Instead, they’re gearing up for their biggest party yet.

2012: Does the Mayan Calendar Predict the End of the World?
In Momostenango, a small town in the highland region of Guatemala, the Quiche Mayan community did not enter the 2012 year dreading doomsday predictions. Instead, they’re gearing up for their biggest party yet. 

Celebrating 2012, Maya Style
December 21, 2012, the end of the Oxlajuj B’ak’tun cycle of 5,128 years—not the end of the world, as commonly, falsely interpreted—is fast approaching, and for Maya in Guatemala, that means it is time to start celebrating.

2012 End-of-the-World Prophecy Discredited (Again)
It seems the closer we get to December 21, 2012, the more we hear the “doomsday” myth repeated. It shows up in films, television commercials, cable specials, and print ads. To Maya priests, however, December 21, 2012, or Oxlajuj Baktun, does not signal the end of the world. The date actually marks the end of a 5,129-year Long Count calendar cycle, the end of one cycle and the beginning of another.

 

Together, We Can Support Indigenous Communities in Nepal

nepal map

Cultural Survival is not a disaster relief organization. We work towards a world in which the rights of Indigenous Peoples are respected, protected, and fulfilled.

Bikalpa Gyan Kedra, an organization in Nepal founded by our Board Member Stella Tamang offers alternative educational opportunities to Indigenous girls and is not a disaster relief organization either, but since the earthquake they have been acting as a shelter to 300 local families. They need basic items like drinking water and food.

Radio Kairan in Kubu-Kasthali is asking for help with purchasing a power generator to get his community radio station back up and running to provide an essential means of communication for villagers on relief efforts as well as to power his community. Cost for this generator would be about $2,500

We have set up a special fund to assist our Indigenous contacts in Nepal. With your help, we can provide some limited assistance to our friends in desperate need.

Donate to Nepal