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Mayan CalendarRead our series on 2012 and hear from Mayan priests on the significance of Oxlajuj Baktun, the end of the “long-count” calendar cycle that finishes up 5,129 years this December 21, 2012.

Walking In Time Towards 2012
The Mayan civilization is one of the cultures that expanded the studies of astronomy, architecture,mathematics, and the arts. Remnants of these studies remain enshrined in the ceremonial centers of Tikal, Palenque and Copan, among others.

2012: Business as Usual
I was visiting the station to learn about the Mayan priests’ expectations and plans for the big Oxlajuj Baktun, the end of the “long-count” calendar cycle that finishes up 5,129 years this December 21, 2012.

2012: End of the World?
In Momostenango, a small town in the highland region of Guatemala, the Quiche Mayan community did not enter the 2012 year dreading doomsday predictions. Instead, they’re gearing up for their biggest party yet.

2012: Does the Mayan Calendar Predict the End of the World?
In Momostenango, a small town in the highland region of Guatemala, the Quiche Mayan community did not enter the 2012 year dreading doomsday predictions. Instead, they’re gearing up for their biggest party yet. 

Celebrating 2012, Maya Style
December 21, 2012, the end of the Oxlajuj B’ak’tun cycle of 5,128 years—not the end of the world, as commonly, falsely interpreted—is fast approaching, and for Maya in Guatemala, that means it is time to start celebrating.

2012 End-of-the-World Prophecy Discredited (Again)
It seems the closer we get to December 21, 2012, the more we hear the “doomsday” myth repeated. It shows up in films, television commercials, cable specials, and print ads. To Maya priests, however, December 21, 2012, or Oxlajuj Baktun, does not signal the end of the world. The date actually marks the end of a 5,129-year Long Count calendar cycle, the end of one cycle and the beginning of another.